Course of Peripheral Occlusive Arterial Disease in Diabetes: Vascular Laboratory Assessment

  1. P J Palumbo, MD
  1. Division of Cardiovascular Diseases and Internal Medicine, Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Endocrinology Metabolism Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Rochester, Minnesota
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Philip J. Osmundson, MD, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

Abstract

To determine comparative rates of development and progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease, 110 healthy nondiabetic control subjects, 112 patients with peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD), 240 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and 100 patientswith diabetes mellitus and peripheral occlusive arterialdisease (DM + POAD) were studied over 4 yr with noninvasive techniques. The presence of peripheral occlusive arterial disease was determined by postexercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) values; progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease was determined by the rate of change in postexercise ABI. Patients who underwent peripheral arterial reconstructive surgery or amputation were also classified as having progression of their peripheral occlusive arterial disease. On this basis, follow-up revealed that peripheral occlusive arterial disease developed and therefore progressed in 1 (1%) of the control group and 22 (9%) of the DM. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease progressed in 31 (28%) of the POAD and 26 (26%) of the DM + POAD. The presence of peripheral occlusive arterial disease predisposes to progression of disease, and peripheral occlusive arterial disease is more likely to develop in diabetic patients who do not have peripheral occlusive arterial disease than in nondiabetic control subjects. However, the presence of diabetes mellitus in patients with peripheral occlusive arterial disease does not seem to increase the risk of progression.

  • Received July 11, 1988.
  • Accepted August 2, 1989.
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