Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes

  1. American Diabetes Association

    CONTENTS

    1. CLASSIFICATION AND DIAGNOSIS

    2. Classification

    3. Diagnosis

    4. SCREENING FOR DIABETES

    5. DETECTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS (GDM)

    6. PREVENTION/DELAY OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

    7. DIABETES CARE

    8. Initial evaluation

    9. Management

    10. Glycemic control

      1. Assessment of glycemic control

        1. Self-monitoring of blood glucose

        2. A1C

      2. Glycemic goals

    11. Medical nutrition therapy

    12. Physical activity

    13. Psychosocial assessment and care

    14. Referral for diabetes management

    15. Intercurrent illness

    16. Immunization

    17. PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES COMPLICATIONS

    18. Cardiovascular disease

      1. Hypertension/blood pressure control

      2. Dyslipidemia/lipid management

      3. Anti-platelet agents

      4. Smoking cessation

      5. Coronary heart disease screening and treatment

    19. Nephropathy screening and treatment

    20. Retinopathy screening and treatment

    21. Foot care

    22. DIABETES CARE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

    23. Children and adolescents

    24. Preconception care

    25. Older individuals

    26. DIABETES CARE IN SPECIFIC SETTINGS

    27. Diabetes care in the hospital

    28. Diabetes care in the school and day care setting

    29. Diabetes care at diabetes camps

    30. Diabetes care at correctional institutions

    31. HYPOGLYCEMIA AND EMPLOYMENT/LICENSURE

    32. THIRD-PARTY REIMBURSEMENT FOR DIABETES CARE, SELF-MANAGEMENT EDUCATION, AND SUPPLIES

    33. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING DIABETES CARE

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. Diabetes care is complex and requires that many issues, beyond glycemic control, be addressed. A large body of evidence exists that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes.

    These standards of care are intended to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payors, and other interested individuals with the components of diabetes care, treatment goals, and tools to evaluate the quality of care. While individual preferences, comorbidities, and other patient factors may require modification of goals, targets that are desirable for most patients with diabetes are provided. These standards are not intended to preclude more extensive evaluation and management of the patient by other specialists as needed. For more detailed information, refer to Bode (Ed.): Medical Management of Type 1 Diabetes (1), Burant (Ed): Medical Management of Type 2 …

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    This Article

    1. doi: 10.2337/diacare.28.suppl_1.S4 Diabetes Care vol. 28 no. suppl 1 s4-s36