A Strong Dose-Response Relation Between Serum Concentrations of Persistent Organic Pollutants and Diabetes: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002

Response to Lee et al.

  1. Miquel Porta, MD, MPH, PHD
  1. From the School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Institut Municipal d’Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
  1. Address correspondence to Prof. Miquel Porta, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Institut Municipal d’Investigació Mèdica, Carrer del Dr Aiguader 80, E-08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. E-mail: mporta{at}imim.es

Lee et al. (1) and Diabetes Care deserve praise for publishing what may be the first study worldwide to analyze, in a sample of a general population, serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and plasma fasting glucose. The main implication of the study is that POPs stored in the adipose tissue may be a key player in the etiopathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. It is even rational to speculate that POPs might be, if not “the single factor” (2), then one factor linking some core components of the metabolic syndrome.

In the study by Lee et al. and other studies (3,4), it seems likely …

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