Is Aspartame Really Safer in Reducing the Risk of Hypoglycemia During Exercise in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

  1. Annie Ferland, RD, MSC,
  2. Patrice Brassard, MSC and
  3. Paul Poirier, MD, PHD, FRCPC, FACC, FAHA
  1. From the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada
  1. Address correspondence to Paul Poirier, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FACC, FAHA, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie, Hôpital Laval, 2725 Chemin Sainte-Foy, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada G1V 4G5. E-mail: paul.poirier{at}crhl.ulaval.ca

In addition to physical activity and healthy food choices, low-calorie sweetening agents, such as aspartame, are a recommended alternative to sugar for patients with type 2 diabetes in order to obtain a better control of carbohydrate intake and blood glucose levels (1–3). The safety of aspartame has been a controversial issue for quite some time now. This noncarbohydrate sweetener is currently found in over 6,000 food products and beverages throughout the world. At present, its attractiveness as an artificial sweetener in the dietary management of diabetes is related to its ∼200-fold sweetening power and the lack of effect on plasma glucose levels compared with sucrose.

We have recently investigated the effect of different …

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