Blood Glucose Control in Type 1 Diabetes With a Bihormonal Bionic Endocrine Pancreas

  1. Edward R. Damiano, PHD2
  1. 1Diabetes Unit and Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  2. 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
  1. Corresponding author: Edward R. Damiano, edamiano{at}bu.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To test whether safe and effective glycemic control could be achieved in type 1 diabetes using a bihormonal bionic endocrine pancreas driven by a continuous glucose monitor in experiments lasting more than two days and including six high-carbohydrate meals and exercise as challenges to glycemic control.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Six subjects with type 1 diabetes and no endogenous insulin secretion participated in two 51-h experiments. Blood glucose was managed with a bionic endocrine pancreas controlling subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon with insulin pumps. A partial meal-priming bolus of insulin (0.035 units/kg/meal, then 0.05 units/kg/meal in repeat experiments) was administered at the beginning of each meal (on average 78 ± 12 g of carbohydrates per meal were consumed). Plasma glucose (PG) control was evaluated with a reference quality measurement on venous blood every 15 min.

RESULTS The overall mean PG was 158 mg/dL, with 68% of PG values in the range of 70–180 mg/dL. There were no significant differences in mean PG between larger and smaller meal-priming bolus experiments. Hypoglycemia (PG <70 mg/dL) was rare, with eight incidents during 576 h of closed-loop control (0.7% of total time). During 192 h of nighttime control, mean PG was 123 mg/dL, with 93% of PG values in the range of 70–180 mg/dL and only one episode of mild hypoglycemia (minimum PG 62 mg/dL).

CONCLUSIONS A bihormonal bionic endocrine pancreas achieved excellent glycemic control with minimal hypoglycemia over the course of two days of continuous use despite high-carbohydrate meals and exercise. A trial testing a wearable version of the system under free-living conditions is justified.

Footnotes

  • Received January 12, 2012.
  • Accepted June 12, 2012.

Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ for details.

| Table of Contents

This Article

  1. Diabetes Care vol. 35 no. 11 2148-2155
  1. Supplementary Data
  2. All Versions of this Article:
    1. dc12-0071v1
    2. 35/11/2148 most recent