Short sleep duration is associated with blood pressure non dipping pattern in type 1 diabetes: The DIAPASOM study

  1. Anne-Laure Borel (alborel{at}chu-grenoble.fr),
  2. Pierre-Yves Benhamou,
  3. Jean-Philippe Baguet,
  4. Isabelle Debaty,
  5. Patrick Levy,
  6. Jean-Louis Pépin and
  7. Jean-Michel Mallion
  1. University hospital, Pôle Digidune, endocrinology department, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble France
  2. University hospital, Pôle Digidune, endocrinology department, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble France
  3. University hospital, Cardiology department, Bioclinic Radiopharmaceutics Laboratory, INSERM U877, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France
  4. University hospital, Pôle Digidune, endocrinology department, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble France
  5. University Hospital, Rehabilitation and Physiology Department, INSERM ERI 17, Espri EA 3745, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France
  6. University Hospital, Rehabilitation and Physiology Department, INSERM ERI 17, Espri EA 3745, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France
  7. University hospital, Cardiology department, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France

    Abstract

    Objective: To assess whether nocturnal blood pressure dipping status in type 1 diabetes is correlated with specific sleep characteristics and differences in nocturnal glycaemic profiles.

    Research Design and Methods: Twenty type 1 adult diabetic patients underwent sleep studies with simultaneous 24h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and continuous nocturnal glucose monitoring.

    Results: Fifty five percent of patients exhibited blunted blood pressure dipping. They did not differ from dippers for age, BMI, systolic (SDP)/diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Total Sleep Period (TSP) was higher in dipper group (497±30 vs. 407±44 min for dippers and non dippers, respectively, p<0.001). TSP was correlated with SBP and DBP day-night differences (r=0.44 and 0.49, respectively). Periods of nocturnal hypoglycaemia (i.e. % of TSP with glycaemia <70mg/dL) were longer in dipper subjects (8.1±10.7 vs. 0.1±0.4% for dippers and non dippers, respectively, p=0.02).

    Conclusions: Dipping status in type 1 diabetes was associated with longer sleep duration and with hypoglycaemia-unawareness.

    Footnotes

      • Received March 4, 2009.
      • Accepted June 5, 2009.

    This Article

    1. Diabetes Care
    1. All Versions of this Article:
      1. dc09-0422v1
      2. 32/9/1713 most recent