SAFETY AND VIABILITY OF MICROENCAPSULATED HUMAN ISLETS TRANSPLANTED INTO DIABETIC HUMANS

  1. Bernard E Tuch (btuch{at}alumni.sydney.edu.au)1,
  2. Gregory W Keogh2,
  3. Lindy J Williams3,
  4. Wei Wu4,
  5. Jayne L Foster4,
  6. Vijayganapathy Vaithilingam5 and
  7. Robert Philips6
  1. 1 FRACP, PhD Diabetes Transplant Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital & University of New South Wales
  2. 2 FRACS Dept Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital
  3. 3 BSc Diabetes Transplant Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital & University of New South Wales
  4. 4 PhD Diabetes Transplant Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital & University of New South Wales
  5. 5 MSc Diabetes Transplant Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital & University of New South Wales
  6. 6 FRANZCR Dept Medical Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital

    Abstract

    Background: Transplantation of insulin-producing cells placed inside microcapsules is being trialled to overcome the need for immunosuppressive therapy.

    Research design: 4 type 1 diabetic people with no detectable C-peptide received an intraperitoneal infusion of islets inside microcapsules of barium alginate (mean 178,200 islet equivalents on each of 8 occasions).

    Results: C-peptide was detected on day 1 post transplantation, and blood glucose levels and insulin requirements decreased. By 1-4 weeks, C-peptide was undetectable. In a multi-islet recipient, C-peptide was detected at 6 weeks after the 3rd infusion, and remains detectable at 2.5 years. Neither insulin requirements nor glycaemic control was affected. Capsules recovered at 16 months were surrounded by fibrous tissue and contained necrotic islets. No major side effects or infection occurred.

    Conclusions: Whilst allografting of encapsulated human islets is safe, efficacy of the cells needs to improve for the therapy to make an impact on the clinical scene.

    Footnotes

      • Received April 20, 2009.
      • Accepted June 15, 2009.

    This Article

    1. Diabetes Care
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