CHANGES IN GLITAZONE USE AMONG OFFICE BASED PHYSICIANS, IN THE UNITED STATES, 2003-2009

  1. Andrew Cohen, BS1,
  2. Atonu Rabbani, PhD2,3,
  3. Nilay Shah, PhD4,5 and
  4. G. Caleb Alexander, MD, MS (galexand{at}uchicago.edu)2,3,6,7
  1. 1. Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  2. 2. Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  3. 3. Center for Health and the Social Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  4. 4. Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota
  5. 5. Knowledge and Encounter Research Unit, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota
  6. 6. MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  7. 7. Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinois

Abstract

Objective: Little is known regarding recent changes in glitazone use.

Research Design And Methods: Interrupted time-series analyses of nationally representative office-visit data using IMS Health's National Disease and Therapeutic Index™.

Results: From 2003 through 2005, glitazone use increased steadily. From February 2005-January 2007, rosiglitazone use decreased by 16% (CI -20% to -11%) annually; pioglitazone use increased at an annual rate of 14% (CI 9% to 18%). During a period of FDA advisories, rosiglitazone use declined sharply from 0.42 million monthly treatment visits (February 2007) to 0.13 million monthly visits (May 2008). Pioglitazone use remained stable, accounting for approximately 5.8 million physician visits (77% of all glitazone use) where a treatment was used during the final 12 months of observation.

Conclusions: The combined effect of scientific publications, advisories, and media exposure was associated with a substantial decrease in rosiglitazone use. Despite a class-level FDA advisory, pioglitazone use was not similarly affected.

Footnotes

    • Received October 2, 2009.
    • Accepted January 13, 2010.

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