Effects of Diet Soda on Gut Hormones in Youths With Diabetes

  1. Kristina I. Rother, MD, MHSC
  1. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland
  1. Corresponding author: Rebecca J. Brown, brownrebecca{at}mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE In patients with type 2 diabetes, but not type 1 diabetes, abnormal secretion of incretins in response to oral nutrients has been described. In healthy youths, we recently reported accentuated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion in response to a diet soda sweetened with sucralose and acesulfame-K. In this study, we examined the effect of diet soda on gut hormones in youths with diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Subjects aged 12–25 years with type 1 diabetes (n = 9), type 2 diabetes (n = 10), or healthy controls (n = 25) drank 240 mL cola-flavored caffeine-free diet soda or carbonated water, followed by a 75-g glucose load, in a randomized, cross-over design. Glucose, C-peptide, GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide Tyr-Tyr (PYY) were measured for 180 min. Glucose and GLP-1 have previously been reported for the healthy control subjects.

RESULTS GLP-1 area under the curve (AUC) was 43% higher after ingestion of diet soda versus carbonated water in individuals with type 1 diabetes (P = 0.020), similar to control subjects (34% higher, P = 0.029), but was unaffected by diet soda in patients with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.92). Glucose, C-peptide, GIP, and PYY AUC were not statistically different between the two conditions in any group.

CONCLUSIONS Ingestion of diet soda before a glucose load augmented GLP-1 secretion in type 1 diabetic and control subjects but not type 2 diabetic subjects. GIP and PYY secretion were not affected by diet soda. The clinical significance of this increased GLP-1 secretion, and its absence in youths with type 2 diabetes, needs to be determined.

  • Received December 13, 2011.
  • Accepted February 1, 2012.

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This Article

  1. Diabetes Care
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