Prevalence of Diagnosed Cancer According to Duration of Diagnosed Diabetes and Current Insulin Use Among U.S. Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes

Findings from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

  1. Lina S. Balluz, MPH, SCD1
  1. 1Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Public Health Surveillance & Informatics Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
  2. 2Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
  1. Corresponding author: Chaoyang Li, cli{at}cdc.gov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed cancer according to duration of diagnosed diabetes and current insulin use among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed data from 25,964 adults aged ≥18 years with diagnosed diabetes who participated in the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

RESULTS After adjustment for potential confounders, we found that the greater the duration of diagnosed diabetes, the higher the prevalence of diagnosed cancers (P < 0.0001 for linear trend). Among adults with diagnosed type 2 diabetes, the prevalence estimate for cancers of all sites was significantly higher among men (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.6 [95% CI 1.3–1.9]) and women (1.8 [1.5–2.1]) who reported being diagnosed with diabetes ≥15 years ago than among those reporting diabetes diagnosis <15 years ago. The prevalence estimate for cancers of all sites was ~1.3 times higher among type 2 diabetic adults who currently used insulin than among those who did not use insulin among both men (1.3 [1.1–1.6]) and women (1.3 [1.1–1.5]).

CONCLUSION Our results suggest that there is an increased burden of diagnosed cancer among adults with a longer duration of diagnosed diabetes and among type 2 diabetic adults who currently used insulin.

  • Received July 19, 2012.
  • Accepted November 21, 2012.

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This Article

  1. Diabetes Care
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