A 10-s Sprint Performed After Moderate-Intensity Exercise Neither Increases nor Decreases the Glucose Requirement to Prevent Late-Onset Hypoglycemia in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes

  1. Paul A. Fournier, PHD2
  1. 1Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. 2School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  3. 3Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  4. 4PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  5. 5Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  6. 6School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  1. Corresponding author: Raymond J. Davey, raymond.davey{at}health.wa.gov.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether performing a 10-s sprint after moderate-intensity exercise increases the amount of carbohydrate required to maintain euglycemia and prevent late-onset postexercise hypoglycemia relative to moderate-intensity exercise alone.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seven individuals with type 1 diabetes underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and performed 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise on two separate occasions followed by either a 10-s maximal sprint effort or no sprint. During the following 8 h, glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia and rates of glucose appearance and disappearance were measured continuously.

RESULTS In response to exercise and throughout the 8-h recovery period, there were no differences in glucose infusion rate, blood glucose levels, plasma insulin concentrations, and rates of glucose appearance and disappearance between the two experimental conditions (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS A 10-s sprint performed after 30-min of moderate-intensity exercise does not affect the amount of carbohydrate required to maintain euglycemia postexercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

  • Received October 26, 2012.
  • Accepted July 8, 2013.

Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ for details.

This Article

  1. Diabetes Care
  1. All Versions of this Article:
    1. dc12-2198v1
    2. 36/12/4163 most recent