Table 4—

Mean differences in IRS score by categories of neighborhood score*

White men (n = 782)
White women (n = 852)
Black men (n = 599)
Black women (n = 860)
Income < 16,000 and high school diploma or lessIncome > 50,000 and some graduate schoolIncome < 16,000 and high school diploma or lessIncome > 50,000 and some graduate school
Quartiles of neighborhood score
 Q1 (lowest)0.14 ± 0.100.44 ± 0.10−0.45 ± 0.220.36 ± 0.330.09 ± 0.180.41 ± 0.26
 Q2−0.06 ± 0.090.25 ± 0.09−0.41 ± 0.210.28 ± 0.290.07 ± 0.190.38 ± 0.24
 Q30.01 ± 0.090.16 ± 0.08−0.001 ± 0.230.18 ± 0.250.26 ± 0.190.14 ± 0.22
 Q4 (highest)ReferenceReferenceReferenceReferenceReferenceReference
P trend across quartiles0.27<0.00010.0060.160.810.04
Mean difference per unit increase in score−0.016 ± 0.008−0.038 ± 0.0070.048 ± 0.017−0.047 ± 0.023−0.0003 ± 0.014−0.037 ± 0.018
  • Data are means ± SE.

  • *

    * In whites, estimates are adjusted for the income and education categories shown in Table 1 as ordinal covariates. In blacks, estimates are shown stratified by personal income and education because of the interactions observed. Mean differences in black men and women were predicted from regression models including interactions between neighborhood score and income, and neighborhood score and education. Income and education included as ordinal covariates representing the categories shown in Table 1. To simplify the presentation, only the two extreme groups (lowest category for both income and education, and highest category for both income and education) are shown.