Table 1—

Age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome in different occupations, stratified according to sex

OccupationMale
Female
n% (95% CI)n% (95% CI)
White collar48,09412.8 (12.4–13.1)42,1374.7 (4.4–5.0)
    General managers and government administrators2,92914.2 (12.8–15.6)6833.6 (2.0–5.2)
    Scientific professionals, technicians, intellectuals16,40511.1 (10.6–11.7)8,7023.7 (3.2–4.2)
    Support technicians and professionals23,68012.7 (12.2–13.2)22,1214.5 (4.1–5.0)
    Clerks and related jobs5,08012.2 (11.2–13.3)10,6314.7 (4.0–5.4)
Blue collar1,40,04313.0 (12.8–13.2)27,7967.4 (7.0–7.8)
    Catering and hospitality, personal and security service workers, and salesmen/women and shop assistants9,82911.3 (10.6–12.0)10,9855.9 (5.3–6.5)
    Skilled workers in agricultural and fishing industries1,35311.7 (9.8–13.5)1828.9 (4.4–13.4)
    Craftsmen/women and skilled workers in manufacturing, construction, and mining55,09911.5 (11.3–11.8)3,8476.8 (5.8–7.8)
    Machine installers, operators, and assemblers35,64815.1 (14.6–15.5)1,6435.2 (3.9–6.6)
    Unskilled workers38,11411.9 (11.5–12.3)11,1397.9 (7.4–8.5)
  • Metabolic syndrome was considered when at least three of the following criteria were present: 1) waist circumference >102 cm in male subjects or >88 cm in female subjects; 2) blood pressure ≥130/85 mmHg or previous diagnosis of or therapy for hypertension; 3) fasting serum triglycerides ≥150 mg/dl (≥1.695 mmol/l); 4) fasting HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dl (<1.036 mmol/l) in male subjects or <50 mg/dl (<1.295 mmol/l) in female subjects; and 5) fasting serum glucose ≥110 mg/dl (≥6.1 mmol/l) or previous diagnosis of or therapy for diabetes (ref. 7). Occupations defined by the 1994 Spanish National Classification of Occupations, (ref. 6). Percentages are age adjusted.