Table 3—

Adjusted analyses of concerns about medications by race/ethnicity, adjusted comparisons in adults with type 2 diabetes from Chicago-area clinics, 2004–2006*

African American vs. CaucasianLatino vs. Caucasian
Statements reflecting medication concerns (likelihood of responding affirmatively)
    I worry about side effects from my medications.1.32 (0.91–1.92)2.92 (1.83–4.64)
    I worry about becoming dependent on my medications.1.57 (1.09–2.28)2.90 (1.83–4.58)
    I worry about the expense of my medications or glucose-monitoring supplies.0.93 (0.64–1.34)1.84 (1.16–2.93)
    If my doctor asked me to change my medication regimen, it would disrupt my daily routine.1.24 (0.75–2.05)1.78 (1.01–3.12)
    If my doctor asked me to change my medication regimen, it would make me worry more about my health.2.29 (1.52–3.45)3.98 (2.46–6.44)
    I worry about switching from name brand to generic drugs.3.29 (2.06–5.26)2.12 (1.21–3.73)
Willingness to take more medications or insulin (likelihood of responding “No”)
    If your doctor told you that you would benefit from taking more medications, would you be willing to take more?2.53 (1.35–4.72)1.48 (0.69–3.15)
    If your doctor told you that you would benefit from taking insulin, would you be willing to take insulin?1.59 (0.94–2.70)1.15 (0.60–2.21)
  • Data are OR (95% CI).

  • *

    * Each logistic regression model adjusted for sex, education (>high school graduate), income (<10,000 USD/year), and duration of diabetes.